Category Archives: Ethos

Love what grows

A professor of mine, let’s call him Professor S teaching ecological restoration, emphasized connection to place and the power of love. That lesson dawned on me today as I thought about the love I felt for a parcel of woods my family and I recently invested in. I considered how my love for the place drew me to work with it, enjoy it, improve it. When we conventionally consider ‘improving’ land, we’re talking about turning the natural environment into the build environment. As I considered this, I realized a lesson that applies far wider than my situation: love what grows.

To improve the parcel, I could buy bricks and bring tools. Or, I could use what grows on site to satisfy my necessities. The trees which provide wood also provide so many other goods – tangible and abstract benefits to both me, the place itself, and the surrounding environment. Continue reading →

Photo: "generic heat" via Arkansas weather channel http://www.4029tv.com/image/view/-/15420634/highRes/2/-/maxh/460/maxw/620/-/wdklas/-/Heat-jpg.jpg

Light movement

L.
Rollin’ stones
Like building a hearth
Like inventorying reptiles in the dark
Like tryn’a find the perfect piece to make a spark
A perfect peace (somewhere in the middle)
Gathering just enough moss to make the perfect [mark]

V.
All in due time
All in the rhythm & the rhyme
All in findings of the mind, for One & ALL
in the One Mind of The ALL
And at that
That’s that

X.

Cidade da Natureza: Mangues

Mangue

Coasting & estuarying

Cidade da Natureza
Onde as marés da mãe da natureza vêm e vão
Um lugar para jovens e idosos, para bens e serviços, para o divertimento e para o trabalho
#Manguetown
City of Nature
Where the waves of the Mother of Nature come & go
A place for young and old, for goods and services, for fun and for work
~~~~~~~
Deep value, literal and metaphoric, in growing our cities in friendship, rather than hardship, with mangroves, all kinds of estuaries and the water they – no, …we… – are all intimately coupled with.

 

The Human Race & The Human Being

Discussing ecological, economic, and social injustice, I noted “how can we do this to ourselves?” Through a dear friend’s response I was reminded that most in the movement don’t accept that the injustice is something we do to ourselves and instead feel the injustice is something a select, privileged few do to a disenfranchised many. We both thought and spoke for a little, agreeing that it is a little bit of both. To defend my point I shared that if I look at it as my privileged self and select few versus the vast many who suffer from my benefits (like having this computer and website to share information through), then there is a clear disconnection that challenges any sort of care and consideration. To truly care and strive for improvement with regard to my fellow human, however unseen and suffering-for-my-benefit they may be, takes empathy and connection – it takes seeing one another as fellow human beings.
Continue reading →

Way of Water: Waterways – Neighborly Rays

What is a watershed?

A watershed is the area of land where all of the water that is under it or drains off of it goes into the same place. John Wesley Powell, scientist geographer, put it best when he said that a watershed is:

“that area of land, a bounded hydrologic system, within which all living things are inextricably linked by their common water course and where, as humans settled, simple logic demanded that they become part of a community.”

Watersheds come in all shapes and sizes. They cross county, state, and national boundaries. …

via the US Environmental Protection Agency

Continue reading →

War on Wastefulness and the Law of Conservation of Energy (the First Law of Thermodynamics)

We send our energies here and there, often in wasteful ways. Can this be reversed? No – to move backward we must still make progress forward in some way.

Though we can not undue our wasteful actions in all cases, we must recognize that our behaviors are never a total loss. Our positive and negative activities progress through our environment. We may never directly see their consequences, but there is no doubt that all things are ultimately connected. In attempting to do better after making errors, we may find that we have exhausted our supplies and cannot try again. This is where we must recognize that our efforts do not end and disappear – there are ways to recapture the essential materials that have been spent in some useful ways. Sometimes this is a stretch: we must look to the lessons we can learn to recapture materials in the form of thoughts; sometimes we must look at a chain of events that comes from our activities and patterns in order to see where the energy has ended up, and what energy and materials may be salvageable in this reservoir.
There is a flow to all things, as there is also a static state. Thus the principles of a watershed apply as lessons for more than conventional ecosystem management.